Is friendship ruining your testing career?

Good blog post from Joel Montvelisky: Is friendship ruining your testing career.

Our main task as testers is to criticize the work of our peers and to provide visibility into the status of our projects.

Criticising in itself is not a bad thing!

The definition of the word is actually “to consider the merits and demerits of (something) and judge accordingly“. For example think about the movie critic who writes a positive review of a movie, or the food critic who recommends a restaurant to his readers.

I’ve previously drawn parallels between my day job as a tester and my evening and weekend activity as a music critic, and so this post counts double for me. I’ve always thought that if you have an adversarial relationship between developers and testers then you’ve doing it wrong, which is one of the points Joel Montvelisky makes.

Not that software testing and music criticism is exactly the same. Most of my testing is on software that’s yet to be released to the customer, whereas records and live performances have already happened. But there’s always the next gig and the next record to consider. I won’t forget the band who thanked me for telling them they needed to change their lineup in a hurry.

Occasional talk of “rock star developers” makes me laugh. Whoever uses the term has never dealt with real rock stars. Though I ought to say that the vast majority of them are lovely.

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2 Responses to Is friendship ruining your testing career?

  1. Michael Orton says:

    Testing team: noun, the other person who knows anything about the application.
    User testing team: noun, extinct species.

    Before complaining about the person testing you code, just remember next time it may be your turn to be the tester.

  2. Thanks Tim!

    First of all for the nice words.
    And second of all because you gave me some good ideas on the parallelism between testing and additional “criticism” jobs that I had not thought about. We may really be able to learn something from this perspective.

    Cheers,

    -joel