Extruded Music Product

Jack Garrett This article, Be prepared for a year of blandness  about Jack Garratt, the “Face of 2016″ makes we want to see all the “tastemakers” at the BBC and elsewhere lined up against the wall and shot.

The way all music that people who take their cues from TV and daytime radio will get to hear is decided by a tiny number of complete philistines in suits is profoundly depressing. This is “music” in much the same way as a McDonald’s hamburger is “food”.

It’s hard having to bite your lip when a friend starts gushing about how wonderful someone like Mumford and Sons are, and not come up with something dreadfully patronising in response. But it still breaks my heart when I see so much genuine talent playing beautiful life-changing music before audiences so small the gigs cannot possibly cover their costs. And meanwhile busker-level talents like Ed bloody Sheeran whose appeal is difficult to fathom are playing stadiums.

I’ve said this so many times before that I’m sounding like a stuck record. But it’s still true.

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5 Responses to Extruded Music Product

  1. Tom B says:

    Quote: “It’s hard having to bite your lip when a friend starts gushing about how wonderful someone like Mumford and Sons are, and not come up with something dreadfully patronising in response. ”

    This made me smile. It describes one of my friends perfectly.

    Quote: “But it still breaks my heart when I see so much genuine talent playing beautiful life-changing music before audiences so small the gigs cannot possibly cover their costs. And meanwhile busker-level talents like Ed bloody Sheeran whose appeal is difficult to fathom are playing stadiums.”

    It makes me angry too, but on a purely selfish level I’d much rather see bands playing in intimate settings like the Robin and Assembly Rooms rather than arenas and stadiums. I do agree though that it’s a tragedy some of the audiences are not bigger. That’s the challenge, how to raise the awareness of the general public to the existence of these bands.

  2. PaulE says:

    It sometimes seems that the public accept the “tastemakers” as quality control but reject their actual choices (something like “if that is the best you have then the rest must be rubbish, so why bother”).
    If only they took that next step and found some music they liked (or realised that their favourite genre didn’t just stop when fashion moved on).

  3. Tim Hall says:

    “or realised that their favourite genre didn’t just stop when fashion moved on”

    That’s very true, and likes at the heart of the “There’s no decent music around today” arguemnt you still hear. We know it’s a case of people with kids and jobs and mortgages and trips to Ikea not having the time to discover new music like they used to.

  4. Tim Hall says:

    In a way I actually feel sorry for Jack Garratt. He’s facing a massive backlash before he’s really got started. Reminds me of the cookie-cutter indie band Joe Lean and the Jing Jang Jong whose hype bubble burst so quickly that they never got as far as releasing an album.

  5. Synthetase says:

    To be honest, I think you’re being a bit harsh on Ed Sheeran. Okay, he’s not Steve Rothery, but he’s not too bad. He does fuse several different musical styles into his ‘singer songwriter with an acoustic guitar and a notebook full of poems’ thing, so it isn’t just a carbon copy of Neil Young or Bob Dylan. It’s not the most intellectually stimulating stuff, but does all music have to be? Sometimes people might just want to enjoy a tune.