Operation Lollipop demonstrates Poe’s Law in action

Last week large numbers of supposed feminists on Twitter were exposed as trolls associated with the notorious troll citadel 4chan, and at least two of the most dubious Twitter hashtags, including #EndFathersDay turned out to be their work, part of an orchestrated mass trolling called “Operation Lollipop”.

Everyone writing about the subject naturally concludes that it confirms their existing point of view. Lola Okolosie and Laurie Penny, writing in The Guardian, saw the whole thing as an extinction burst.

The reason sexist trolls fretting alone in their bedrooms are frightened of political women online, particularly women of colour, is the same reason they won’t win. Despite our differences, and even because of our differences, we are powerful, and we are many, and this is our time, not theirs.

Meanwhile the former Communists turned right-libertarians of Spiked Online consider the whole thing to be a useful parody.

There is something pretty pompous about the rigid etiquette of the Twitter activists’ call-out culture that begs to be mocked.

If hashtag activism is easily parodied, then that shows what is wrong with it. By drawing out the excessiveness of hashtags like #SolidarityisforWhiteWomen or #KillAllMen, the 4channers were doing everyone a favour. The wisest point about Twitter was made by playwright Steven Berkoff: if you jump in a dustbin you cannot complain that you are covered in rubbish.

The whole thing does seem like a very good practical demonsration of Poe’s Law, which states:

Without a blatant display of humour, it is impossible to create a parody of extremism or fundamentalism that someone won’t mistake for the real thing.

And that’s true about this. By no means everyone who picked up and ran with their fake hashtags were 4chan’s adolescent racists and sexists.  And quite a few right-wing anti-feminist types, including the arch misogynist Paul Elam fell for it too.

What it has done is exposed the weaknesses of “Hashtag activism”. Twitter’s 140-character limit means activist soundbites are stripped of all context and nuance, and Twitter always tends to magnify the loudest voices at the expense of the wisest. Even well-intentioned hashtags frequently become toxic as more people jump on, and nobody can control or moderate them.

Whether it will lead to any self-reflection remains to be seen. I’m not holding my breath.

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