Tag Archives: GamerGate

David Auerbach on GamerGate and the Clickbait Media

Slate journalist David Auerbach posted a couple of quite significant things on Twitter a few days ago. It’s a screencap, which I know will have accessibility issues, but I couldn’t find the original text anywhere. There is a larger resolution version which is slighly more readable

Auerbach

When we finally write the history of the Twitter wars I hope that history covers the role of the clickbait media and the way they’ve often been willing to pour petrol on flames in order to monetise faux-outrage. The infamous #Shirtstorm was one of the most notorious; where a clickbait “news” website went with the cynically inflammatory headine “I don’t care they you just landed a probe on a comet, your shirt is alienating“, thus guaranteeing the internet would explode in a flame war that would end in people getting hurt.

As for Gamergate. I’ve been watching the issue from the sidelines for the past year, and it’s becoming increasingly clear that both the “Gamegame is a hate group targeting women and minorities” and the “It’s all about ethics in game journalism” are at best gross oversimplifications of a complex and confusing mess, and at worst deliberate and cynical lies.

My perception (which may be wrong) is that the persistence of Gamergate owes a lot to the nature of some of their more publicly vocal opponents, at least some of whom appear to be attention-seekers looking for their fifteen minutes of fame, who take Gamergate’s public mocking of them as validation. When more than one journalist has told me they won’t cover Gamergate because of the harassment and personal abuse they get from GG’s opponents, it paints a rather different picture to the narrative’s we’ve seen in the media.

As far as I can tell, Gamergate seems to consist of three groups. The first are gamers who, rightly or wrongly, had an axe to grind against the gaming press which they saw as agenda-driven and riven with conflicts of interest, much like the British music press of the 1980s. Second are opportunistic right wing types who had little connection with the gaming hobby but saw it as another front in a wider cultural war against “Social Justice Warriors”. Third were the malevolent trolls for whom the whole thing provided perfect cover to ruin people’s lives while letting others take the blame. The media narrative only acknowledges the last two of these three. Meanwhile the Ganergaters for whom it’s all about ethics are too quick to deny any connection with the trolls who have gathered under their banner.

The problem with Gamergate is that the only media outlets who have been covering the story are those who were themselves part of the story, on both sides, or are repeating their talking points without doing any investigation themselves. Nobody without a pre-existing agenda is interested in touching it.

The truth is eventually going to come out.

Given the contentious nature of this subject, I’m going to be strict on moderating comments. I’ll probably approve most comments from people I know and trust, but drive-bys with canned talking points may not be so lucky.

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Get Your Sea Lions Off Our Lawn

The hashtag #MetalGate has spring up on Twitter over the past few days. Despite claims that “Social Justice Warriors” have declared war on metal, the only links being passed around are to a notorious MRA site I won’t link to, and to a sife called Death Metal Underground which blows the racist dog-whistle at heavy metal volumes.

Basically SJWs are complaining about how people who enjoy metal tend to be racist, misogynist, and homophobic the three favorite strawman attacks of the left and exclude those who are not white “cisgendered” males. As you know, the average white man in the West Virginian coal mines has much more prosperity and opportunity than the rest of the ethnic and gender groups in the country, so there is no reason that white men should have a right to have any pride in their ethnic identity or have anything unique that they can identify with.

The rather more reputable MetalSucks dismisses the whole thing as total hogwash.

But my ultimate problem with #metalgate is that it’s entirely manufactured. No one, or no group, is banding together to try and change metal in any one specific way — the threat is entirely imagined. Certain social values enter the metalsphere simply because those values are spreading throughout society as a whole — this idea that “SJWs” failed with #gamergate so they’re now moving on to a different cause is total bologna. They’re entirely separate people!

Precisely. Hack journalists have been writing poorly-researched articles riddled with lazy stereotypes about metal and metal fans for decades. And metal fans have been calling them out on it for just as long. You do occasionally hear people say “Metal is racist because metal fans are predominately white”, but nobody with the remotest of clues takes them seriously. And no, mentioning the fact that Varg Vikernes of Burzum is a neo-Nazi and a convicted murderer isn’t the same thing.

If you actually look at the #MetalGate tag on Twitter, it’s all the same people as #GamerGate. It doesn’t have much to with actual metal fandom. Please get your sea-lions off Metal’s lawn.

But it does make you wonder how the whole thing started. Today’s big story in metal is the sacking of Phil McSorley from Cobalt after a bigoted meltdown on Facebook, to the tune of “Good bloody riddance” from several prominent metal music writers.

The decision to go separate ways is not at all surprising. McSorley, the former vocalist of Cobalt and current force behind the raw black metal band Recluse, employed some colorful hate slurs while accusing a prominent metal journalist of trying to build a “USBM friendship scene,” and bringing a “liberal agenda” of political correctness and social awareness into metal.

Now, I have no idea if acolytes of McSorley have anything to do with the appearance of the MetalGate tag. But the timing does seem something of a coincidence.

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It seems as though “Gamers are over” is the new “Rock is dead”. We’ve been hearing that rock is dead from people that have never liked rock in the first place, but rock has always refused to go away.

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Gamergate’s complaints about agenda-driven reviews make me wonder how on earth gamers would have reacted had the video game press been anything like as bad as the “mainstream” British music press has been for decades. Have there been reviews remotely equivalent to Dave McCulloch’s dismissive one-star review of Pink Floyd’s “The Wall” in Sounds? Are there any gaming journalists as appallingly bad as Julie Burchill?

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The Trouble With Twitter

Fail WhaleI am getting sick of #GamerGate on Twitter, especially when I have online acquaintances on both “sides”.  There way too much toxicity swilling aroud the whole thing, to which people on both sides are contributing. It’s yet another example of the failure mode of “Hashtag activism”, and I know I’m not the only person who wonders if all this negativity is sucking out all the positive aspects of Twitter.

I’m not the only one who thinks this:

Dave Rickey writing in Zen of Design

Twitter is a breeding ground for social dysfunction, where you are lulled into a sense of community and comradery because everyone you follow and everyone that follows you are basically in agreement. The only things that can penetrate the bubble are “Outrage Porn” being retweeted into it, and attacks responding to outrage porn that is being passed around other bubbles.

There’s no room for nuance or in-depth discussion, and anyone who makes the mistake of trying will see their lengthy and thoughtful think-piece distilled down to a barely-true (if that) 140 character sound bite that will be used as a new piece of outrage porn.

David Auerbach writing in Slate:

People are accustomed to being irreverent in conversations with friends, but on Twitter, anyone who might take offense is likely to overhear (unless your tweets are protected, but why be on Twitter in that case?). At least you can go on Reddit without having the repugnant Philosophy of Rape subreddit being shoved in your face; Twitter drags everyone down to the bottom. No matter whom you unfollow, mute, or block, someone you do follow will sooner or later draw your attention to an outrage and encourage you to join the condemnation. On Twitter, negativity is viral.

Twitter didn’t used to be like this. I can remember the times when it was the virtual equivalent of the friendly local pub where all your mates hung out and you swapped joles and stories. I remember reading Robert Scoble’s blog post from five years ago claiming Twitter didn’t suffer from the “forum/chatroom problem” because your feed showed only people you’d invited to join the conversation.

We’ve lost that somewhere along the line.

Maybe it was when Twitter gave greater prominence to the notifications tab. Maybe it all went pear-shaped when they introduced the retweet, something Robert Scoble raised as a concern. Or maybe it was just that, like so many other places, Twitter was better in the early days before the rabble arrived, when most people were enthusiastic early adopters.

Twitter at it’s best can still be great fun; I love the rapid-fire exchanges between one particular group of friends who managed a mashup of The Shipping Forecast and Bruce Forsythe’s Generation Game (“…set of matching luggage 4, becoming 5 later…“)

But I can’t help feeling that either we all need to be smarter in our use of Twitter, with a little less “outrage porn”, ot Twitter needs to rethink some aspects of how the service works, so it amplifies the loudest voices a little less.

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#GamerGate – An Issue With Two Sides

This is an insightful piece in TechCrunch about the #GamerGate controversy

Two sides have emerged, which believe in completely different realities. If you are to listen to the extreme of one side, you will hear that gamers are reactionary right-wingers who excuse harassment. If you listen to the extreme of the other side, every critic of GamerGate is a brainwashed activist who thinks liking Hitman Absolution or GTAV makes you worse than Hitler.

Holding up the extremes of both sides is a great way to avoid dialogue. It’s politics – not, as Tadhg Kelly suggests, in the sense of liberals versus conservatives, but in the more fundamental sense of “my side” versus “your side.”

Though I don’t share the author’s libertarian politics, having seen these same culture wars play out across the tabletop RPG hobby and Science Fiction fandom over the past two or three years, it’s very difficult to disagree with anything he says.

This is an issue where I’m unwilling to take sides because I believe both sides are wrong, and both sides have embraced the mistaken idea that these culture wars are a zero-sum game.

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GamerGate vs Music Journalism

Gamergate still seems to show little sign of dying down, and forms part of the much larger cultural wars that have been raging across the tabletop RPG and SFF worlds over the past couple of years. As is usual for the internet, the loudest and most extreme voices are getting all the attention, and all nuance is lost.

I don’t really know much about the current state of video game journalism, so I don’t know quite how accurate the accusations and counter-accusations I’ve been seeing might be. But they do suggest there are parallels with the state of music journalism and criticism.

Good criticism is an important part of any artistic ecosystem. Critics certainly have a role in publicising and promoting great art. It should go without saying that constructive criticism plays a part in making good art better. And, whatever some fanboys might say, criticism does have a role in calling out bad art that’s undeserving of anyone’s time and money. There is much in the music world that is derivative, formulaic and clichéd. There is art that is tasteless and offensive for its own sake. And there is pretentious nonsense that is nowhere near as clever as it likes to think it is.

But as every music fan ought to know, there is as much bad criticism as there is bad music. There are reviews that seem little more than regurgitated press releases. There are unfairly negative reviews that fail to engage with what the artist is trying to do. There are reviews that have an obvious and unsubtle agenda shared by neither artist nor audience. And the cardinal sin of criticism is still reviewing the audience rather than the performance, usually accompanied by a sneer.

Does any of that sound familiar?

But ultimately both bad art and bad reviews have an absolute right to exist, and only become a problem when they start drowning out everything better. This has been a recurring problem in the music world, but has slowly faded away as the internet has eroded the powers of the old gatekeepers. Is it the same in the world of video games?

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Gamergate

The intensity of the #Gamergate shitstorm has me rolling my eyes in disbelief.

It is difficult to understand how the revelation that one game developer was sleeping with a reviewer represents wholesale corruption in the entire games industry. And it’s near impossible to believe the gaming press could be remotely as corrupt or as destructive as vast swathes of the music press have been for decades. Although it has to be said that one or two of the inflammatory editorials I’ve seen appear to have been written with the deliberate intention of pouring petrol on the flames.

I’m not into video games, but my social media feeds are filling up with it all the same. From the outside the whole thing looks like yet another round in the same culture wars we’ve been seeing across the SFF fandom and the Tabletop RPG worlds over the past couple of years. It’s the same mess of entrenched positions and exclusionary rhetoric where truth is the first casualty, and the internet is yet again amplifying the loudest and most polarising voices.

The way these things constantly blow up over relatively trivial issues is getting very wearing. I’m not surprised that I’m seeing good people quit social media, burned out by the never-ending outrage.

Of course, whenever there’s a shitstorm of this natures, the trolls descent like vultures, but we should be wary of claims tying those trolls to any wider demographic.

It shouldn’t need to be said that there is no justification for anonymous threats aimed at individuals, ever.

If you are one of those who thinks these wars are a fight to the death between “Us” and “Them”, and you consider a sizeable part of the fandom or hobby as “Them”, then you are part of the problem, regardless of which “side” you are rooting for.

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